Sebastopol Geese

Sebastopol geese are a medium sized breed with long curly feathers. The feathers on their necks and head are smooth, however the rest of their body is covered with curly feathers. There are two varieties, curly and smooth breasted. Smooth breasted don’t have any curly feathers on their chest. When these two varieties are bred together the offspring resulting should be 50% curly and 50% smooth breasted. There have been several colours of sebastopols developed in recent years however white is the only recognized colour. The will weigh 10-14 pounds at maturity. They have orange legs and bills, while their eyes are a bright blue. Females should lay 25-35 eggs per year. Sebastopol geese can not fly well if at all because of their curly feathers. The breed is believed to have been developed in central Europe along the Danube and Black Sea. However the first birds to arrive in England were documented to have originated in the Crimea and were shipped from the port of Sevastopol, Ukraine. By the 1800’s they were wide spread among countries¬†surrounding the Black Sea. The alternate name of Danubian reflects their prominence around the Danube river. Originally sebastopol geese were bred to use their feathers for pillows and quilts. Sebastopol geese increased in size once they arrived in North America as a result of breeding to Embden geese. The only recognized variety in North America is the curly breasted, while smooth breasted are preferred in Europe.¬†Sebastopols are not as well insulated as other breeds of geese since their feathers do not lie flat on their bodies. This should be kept in mind when wintering them, that they may¬†need better protection from the elements. Sebastopols do seem to start laying sooner than other breeds, however fertility can be a problem with them. However they are excellent show birds, but are still big enough for use as a table bird if desired.

Duckopolis breeds:

White

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